The impact of degree field on the earnings of male and female college graduates

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Abstract

Since the gender demographics across majors have dramatically changed over the last few decades, a re-examination of the relationship between gender, undergraduate major selection, and compensation levels once in the workforce is important. This article will focus on how the salaries of college graduates have changed over the last decade. The analyses will explore the extent to which undergraduate major selection contributes to any male-female salary gap. A comparison of regression models for 1993 and 2001 describes the extent to which the selection of major remains a significant factor among those individuals who have entered the workforce.

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How to Cite
Freeman, C. E. ., Snyder, T. D. ., & Connolly, B. (2005). The impact of degree field on the earnings of male and female college graduates. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 13, 16. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v13n16.2005
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Author Biographies

Catherine E. Freeman, U.S. Department of Education

Catherine Freeman is a Research Associate with the Annual Reports Program at the National Center for Education Statistics. She holds a M.Ed. in Educational Administration from the University of Texas –Austin and a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in Education Policy. Her concentration is on educational policy issues and resource allocation consequences

Thomas D. Snyder, U.S. Department of Education

Thomas Snyder is Director of the Annual Reports Program at the National Center for Education Statistics. He is responsible for the annual Digest of Education Statistics, as well as a variety of other periodic statistical reports. He holds a master's degree in history from George Mason University.

Brooke Connolly, American Institutes for Research

Brooke A. Connolly, formerly of American Institutes of Research, received an M.A. in Educational Research from the University of Michigan in December of 2004. She received a B.A. in Psychology from Dickinson College. Her current work in educational equity focuses on differential access to highly qualified teachers.