Antecedents and consequences of residential choice and school transfer.

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Abstract

This article examines the antecedents and consequences of residential choice and school transfers within one of the eight largest urban school districts in Texas. This study is based on survey data from a representative sample of parents of K-12 students enrolled in this district. In addition to demographic characteristics of the family, the parent decision-making model of Schneider, Teske, & Marschall (2000) was examined to determine if aspects of this model were useful in understanding the school choices made at the beginning of the school year and the parents' motivation to move to another school at the end. The results provide some support for the view that residential choice is related to enhanced achievement and satisfaction; while, within-district transfers were used more by better educated White parents who did not qualify as low income. Parents' motivation to move their children to another school was greater when they perceived the school as less receptive to their involvement and their children as less successful in school.

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How to Cite
Falbo, T., Glover, R. W. ., Holcombe, W. L. ., & Stokes, S. L. . (2005). Antecedents and consequences of residential choice and school transfer. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 13, 29. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v13n29.2005
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Author Biographies

Toni Falbo, The University of Texas at Austin

Toni Falbo is Professor of Educational Psychology and Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include family influences on achievement and international research.

Robert W. Glover, The University of Texas at Austin

Robert W. Glover is Research Scientist at the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. His research has focused on various aspects of learning and work.

W. Lee Holcombe, University of Texas at Dallas

Lee Holcombe is Assistant Director of the Texas Schools Project at the Green Center at the University of Texas at Dallas. In addition to his survey analysis work, his research interests include the analysis of longitudinal data to address education policy issues.

S. Lynne Stokes, Southern Methodist University

Lynne Stokes is Professor of Statistical Science at Southern Methodist University. Her current areas of interest are sampling methods, non-sampling errors, and non-disclosure methodology.