Social pedagogy: historical traditions and transnational connections

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Abstract

With over 150 years of history, social pedagogy is both an interdisciplinary scholarly field of inquiry and a field of practice that is situated in the intersection of three areas of human activity: education, social work and community development. Although social pedagogy has different emphases and approaches depending on particular historical and geographical contexts, a common theme is that it deals with the connections between educational and social dynamics, or put in a different way, it is concerned with the educational dimension of social issues and the social dimensions of educational issues. The first part of this paper analyzes the history of the field of social pedagogy since its origins until today, with a focus on transnational flows between Europe and the Americas. The second part of the paper discusses the main issues raised in this special issue of EPAA, and extracts the main threads and connections among the different papers included in the volume.

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How to Cite
Schugurensky, D., & Silver, M. (2013). Social pedagogy: historical traditions and transnational connections. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 21, 35. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v21n35.2013
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Author Biographies

Daniel Schugurensky, Arizona State University

Full professor at Arizona State University (ASU), with a joint appointment in the School of Public Affairs and the School of Social Transformation. Head of the Area of Justice and Social Inquiry, and coordinator of the Masters program in Social and Cultural Pedagogy. Has written extensively on youth and adult education, community development and participatory democracy. Among his recent authored and co-edited books are Ruptures, continuities and re-learning: The political participation of Latin Americans in Canada (Transformative Learning Centre, University of Toronto, 2006), Four in Ten: Spanish-Speaking Youth and Early School Leaving in Toronto (LARED, 2009), Learning citizenship by practicing democracy: international initiatives and perspectives (Cambridge Scholarly Press, 2010), Paulo Freire (Continuum, 2011), and Volunteer work, informal learning and social action (Sense 2013).

Michael Silver, ASU

Michael Silver is a Research Fellow at the National Center on Education and the Economy and the Center for the Future of Arizona.  As Doctoral Student in Educational Policy and Evaluation, his research focuses on policies affecting educational equity and issues of social justice - particularly those related to historically vulnerable, minority populations.