Comparison of Academic Development in Catholic versus Non-Catholic Private Secondary Schools

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Abstract

Utilizing hierarchical linear models, this study of 144 private schools (72 Catholic and 72 non-Catholic schools) drawn from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 discovered that Catholic school students scored lower in reading than students at non-Catholic private schools. Analysis of internal school characteristics suggested that lower growth in reading achievement might be related in part to lower student morale in Catholic schools. However, we found no significant differences between Catholic and non-Catholic private secondary schools in the development of students' math, history/social studies, and science abilities from eighth to tenth grades. This study also identified important student- and school-level variables such as Catholicism, gender, risk factor, parental involvement, and enrollment size that help to explain the outcomes.

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How to Cite
Kim, M. M. ., & Placier, M. (2004). Comparison of Academic Development in Catholic versus Non-Catholic Private Secondary Schools. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 12, 5. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v12n5.2004
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Author Biographies

Mikyong Minsun Kim, University of Missouri-Columbia

Mikyong Minsun Kim is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Kim's areas of specialization include education policy, assessment and equity issues in education, college and school impact, organizational analysis, and quantitative research methods.

Margaret Placier, University of Missouri-Columbia

Margaret Placier is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Placier's areas of specialization include education policy, sociology of education, teacher education, and qualitative research methods.