Brokering knowledge mobilization networks: Policy reforms, partnerships, and teacher education

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Abstract

Educational researchers and policy-makers are now expected by funding agencies and their institutions to innovate the multidirectional ways in which our production of knowledge can impact the classrooms of teachers (practitioners), while also integrating their experiential knowledge into the landscape of our research. In this article, we draw on the curriculum implementation literature to complicate our understandings of knowledge mobilization (KMb). Policy implementation, we suggest, can be understood as one specific type of KMb. We draw on different models for KMb and curriculum implementation and develop a relational model for KMb. Utilizing our model we critically reflect on the specific successes and challenges encountered while establishing, building, and sustaining the capacity of our KMb network. Our findings suggest that faculties of education are uniquely positioned to act as secondary brokers for the implementation of policy reforms within public education systems. To this end, we discuss how a relational KMb network is a “best practice” for establishing and sustaining partnerships among policy makers, educational researchers, and public school practitioners.

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How to Cite
Ng-A-Fook, N., Kane, R., Butler, J., Glithero, L., & Forte, R. (2015). Brokering knowledge mobilization networks: Policy reforms, partnerships, and teacher education. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 23, 122. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v23.2090
Section
Knowledge Mobilization in Education
Author Biographies

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook is Director of the Teacher Education program at the University of Ottawa. He is an Associate Professor of Curriculum Theory and is the founder and director of A Canadian Curriculum Theory Project (see www.curriculumtheoryproject.ca).

Ruth Kane, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Education

Ruth G. Kane is a full professor in Teacher Education at the University of Ottawa. Her current research focuses on the preparation of teachers for Urban Priority High Schools through sustainable partnerships with schools and teachers.

Jesse Butler, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Education

Jesse K. Butler is a PhD student at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on education policy and the impact it has on Indigenous communities.

Lisa Glithero, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Education

Lisa Glithero is a lecturer and research associate at the University of Ottawa.  Her research interests focus on environmental education, youth civic engagement, education policy and the linkages between to address global sustainability challenges (www.lisaglithero.ca).

Rita Forte, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Education

Rita Forte is a doctoral candidate at the University of Ottawa. Her research focuses on peace education, cosmopolitanism, and the interrelationships between curriculum and governance.