Identification of Elementary Teachers’ Risk for Stress and Vocational Concerns Using the National Schools and Staffing Survey

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Abstract

Transactional models of stress suggest that elementary teachers who appraise classroom demands as higher than classroom resources are more vulnerable to stress and likely to experience vocational concerns. Previous research using the Classroom Appraisal of Resources and Demands (CARD), a measure designed to assess teacher perceptions of classroom demands and resources, has supported transactional models with local samples. The current study replicated this previous research with two waves of large nationally representative data from the Schools and Staffing Survey (1999-2000 and 2007-2008). Theoretically-predicted differences were found, suggesting that an understanding of individual elementary teachers’ perceptions of demands and resources in the classroom could have important implications for policy and research aimed at addressing teachers’ vocational concerns. 

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How to Cite
Lambert, R. G., McCarthy, C. J., Fitchett, P. G., Lineback, S., & Reiser, J. (2015). Identification of Elementary Teachers’ Risk for Stress and Vocational Concerns Using the National Schools and Staffing Survey. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 23, 43. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v23.1792
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Author Biographies

Richard G. Lambert, Professor, Department of Eductional Leadership University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Dr. Richard Lambert is a Professor of Educational Research at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He specializes in applied statistics, teacher stress and coping, and assessment for young children.

Christopher J. McCarthy, Professor, Department of Educational Psychology University of Texas at Austin

Christopher J. McCarthy is a Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. He studies stress and coping, particularly in educational contexts. 

Paul G. Fitchett, Associate Professor, Department of Middle, Secondary, and K12 Education University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Paul G. Fitchett is an Associate Professor in the Department of Middle, Secondary, and K12 Education at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He studies the intersections between teacher working conditions, student learning outcomes, and educational policy.

Sally Lineback, Doctoral Student, Department of Educational Psychology University of Texas At Austin

Sally Lineback is a doctoral student in Counseling Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a former teacher and currently studies teacher stress and coping, with a particular interest in gay and lesbian teachers’ experiences with stress.

Jenson Reiser, Doctoral Student, Department of Educational Psychology University of Texas at Austin

Jenson Reiser is a doctoral candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include stress and coping in educational settings; specifically, the research and development of in-school interventions to help teachers reduce and manage stress.