Teacher job satisfaction by principal support and teacher cooperation: Results from the Schools and Staffing Survey

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Abstract

Although turnover rates are alarmingly high for early career and veteran teachers, turnover rates are even higher for those who identify as a teacher of color. To increase the retention of teachers, job satisfaction has become an important construct to analyze. Teacher cooperation and principal support within the school are two influential factors that directly relate to job satisfaction. Using the restricted 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey, a nationally representative dataset, principal support, teacher cooperation, and their moderation effects were analyzed in relation to teacher job satisfaction using a series of multilevel models. After controlling for teacher- and school-level characteristics, principal support and teacher cooperation were statistically significant predictors of job satisfaction for all teachers. The moderation effect between the two variables of interest and race were also statistically significant. These findings emphasize the need to maintain professional communities where teachers can interact and collaborate with the support of their school leaders.

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How to Cite
Olsen, A., & Huang, F. (2019). Teacher job satisfaction by principal support and teacher cooperation: Results from the Schools and Staffing Survey. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 27, 11. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.27.4174
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Author Biographies

Amanda Olsen, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Amanda A. Olsen is a postdoctoral fellow at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. She is an applied quantitative methodologist who investigates topics related to equity in education.

Francis Huang, University of Missouri - Columbia

Francis L. Huang is an associate professor in the Statistics, Measurement, and Evaluation in Education Program in the Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology at the University of Missouri. He is an applied quantitative methodologist with current substantive interests in school climate, the disproportional use of exclusionary disciplinary sanctions, and various policy-relevant topics. His methodological focus has been on the analysis of clustered data and the development of empirically supported scales and measures.