Comparative and critical analysis of competency standards for school principals: Towards an inclusive and equity perspective in Québec

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Abstract

This article presents the results of a comparative and critical study of the competency standards of Québec school administrators compared with seven other education systems within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). An inductive-type analysis has made it possible to identify the social categories targeted in the standards, the vision of school leaders as well as the competencies that are likely to help advance educational and societal goals of equity, inclusion, and social justice. Three contrasting perspectives emerge from this analysis. In Australia, California, and the United States, principals are explicitly encouraged to take action against structures and practices that undermine the educational success and social recognition of minority groups. In British Columbia and New Zealand, statements about social diversity focus more on the transformation of individual practices. Finally, in the standards of England, Texas and Québec, only a few generic statements referring to the differentiated needs of students and their success have been identified. They are instead characterized by a managerial approach oriented toward results that are measurable and cost controlled. In conclusion, a more in-depth analysis of the Québec standards opens the door to a new competency model and recommendations.

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How to Cite
Larochelle-Audet, J., Magnan, M.-O., Potvin, M., & Doré, E. (2019). Comparative and critical analysis of competency standards for school principals: Towards an inclusive and equity perspective in Québec. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 27, 112. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.27.4217
Section
Standards and Competency Frameworks for School Administrators
Author Biographies

Julie Larochelle-Audet, Université de Montréal

Julie Larochelle-Audet is an assistant professor of educational administration at the Faculty of Education of the Université de Montréal and a member of the Groupe de recherche interrégional sur l’organisation du travail des directions d’établissement d’enseignement. Its most recent projects address the issues of work, training and competencies development of school principals from the perspective of equity, inclusion, and social justice.

Marie-Odile Magnan, Université de Montréal

Marie-Odile Magnan is an associate professor of sociology of education at the Faculty of Education of the Université de Montréal and a member of the Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la formation et la profession enseignante. Its projects involve the implementation of the principles of equity and inclusion in institutional practices and on the academic experiences and identity of young people from minoritized groups.

Maryse Potvin, Université du Québec à Montréal

Maryse Potvin is a full professor of sociology of education at the Université du Québec à Montréal and head of the Observatoire sur la formation à la diversité et l’équité (OFDE). For 25 years, her work and publications have focused on racism and ethnic relations in Québec and Canada, especially regarding public structures, social and mediatized discourse, and issues of identity, equity, education and training (in anti-racism, inclusiveness, interculturality, human rights).

Emmanuelle Doré, Université de Montréal

Emmanuelle Doré is a doctoral candidate in educational administration at the Université de Montréal and a visiting professor in the Department of Didactics of the Faculty of Education at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her research focuses on leadership, social justice, the concept of “at-risk student,” relationships between social actors in the public education system, and discourse as a social practice.