Strategies and tactics in academic knowledge production by multilingual scholars

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Abstract

In the past decade, academic evaluation systems worldwide have markedly increased the use of mechanisms that privilege the use of English in journal publishing. In the context of these trends, this article highlights our findings from more than 12 years of research on the experiences and perspectives of 50 multilingual European scholars with writing for publication, particularly in English. We draw on de Certeau’s (1984) notions of strategies and tactics to explore key ways in which scholars manage often-competing demands and interests in writing for publication. Scholars both adopt strategies that align with official publication policies and use tactics that support scholars’ sometimes competing agendas. At different moments scholars embrace, accommodate, or resist the perceived dominance of English in knowledge production regimes and evaluation systems. We conclude by summarizing the value of drawing on the notions of strategy and tactics in an era of increasing debates over evaluation systems.

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How to Cite
Curry, M. J., & Lillis, T. M. (2014). Strategies and tactics in academic knowledge production by multilingual scholars. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 22, 32. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v22n32.2014
Section
The Future of Educational Research Journals
Author Biographies

Mary Jane Curry, University of Rochester

Dr. Curry is Associate Professor in the Department of Teaching and Curriculum at the University of Rochester’s Warner Graduate School of Education. She holds a doctorate in Curriculum Theory from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a master’s degree in TESOL from the University of Massachusetts/Boston. She is co-author of A scholar’s guide to publishing journal articles in English: Critical choices and practical strategies (Multilingual Matters, 2013); Academic writing in a global context: The politics and practices of publishing in English (Routledge, 2010); and Teaching academic writing: A toolkit for higher education (Routledge, 2002) and co-editor of Language, literacy, and learning in STEM Education: Research methods and perspectives from applied linguistics (John Benjamins, in press).

Theresa M Lillis, The Open University

Dr. Lillis is Professor in English Language and Applied Linguistics in the Centre for Language and Communication at the Open University, UK. She has a doctorate from Sheffield Hallam University and masters’ degrees from University College Dublin (medieval studies) and the University of Sheffield (applied linguistics).  Publications include co-authored books such as A scholar’s guide to publishing journal articles in English: Critical choices and practical strategies (Multilingual Matters, 2013); Academic writing in a global context: The politics and practices of publishing in English (Routledge, 2010); and Teaching academic writing: A toolkit for higher education (Routledge, 2002) and single-authored books such as Student writing: Access, regulation, desire (Routledge 2001) and The sociolinguistics of writing (Edinburgh University Press, 2013).