Knowledge brokers in education: How intermediary organizations are bridging the gap between research, policy and practice internationally

Main Article Content

Abstract

Interest in how to better connect research to policy and practice is gaining momentum globally. Also gaining widespread agreement is the view that intermediary organizations have an important role to play in facilitating multi-stakeholder partnerships between researchers, practitioners and policymakers in order to increase the mobilization of research and its impact in public service sectors. Knowledge mobilization (KMb) includes efforts to strengthen linkages between research, practice and policy in public service sectors. This special issue explores a range of intermediary organizations, networks and initiatives in order to showcase how research-practice-policy gaps are being addressed in different contexts.  

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How to Cite
Cooper, A., & Shewchuk, S. (2015). Knowledge brokers in education: How intermediary organizations are bridging the gap between research, policy and practice internationally. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 23, 118. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v23.2355
Section
Knowledge Mobilization in Education
Author Biographies

Amanda Cooper, Queen's University

Dr. Amanda Cooper is an Assistant Professor in Educational Policy and Leadership at Queen’s University in Canada.  She is the Principal Investigator of RIPPLE - Research Informing Policy, Practice and Leadership in Education (www.ripplenetwork.ca) - a program of research, training and KMb aimed at learning more about how knowledge brokering (KB) can increase research use and its impact in public service sectors by facilitating collaboration between multi-stakeholder networks. 

Samantha Shewchuk, Queen's University

Samantha Shewchuk is an elementary school teacher and a doctoral student in the Faculty of Education at Queen’s University.  Her research explores knowledge mobilization at the intersection of the education and child welfare sectors; more specifically, how outcomes for abused children can be improved by increasing research use in these sectors.  She is the program manager of Dr. Amanda Cooper’s RIPPLE program, Research Informing Policy Practice and Leadership in Education (www.ripplenetwork.ca).