The academic achievement of Limited English Proficient (LEP) youth in new and established immigrant states: Lessons from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

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Abstract

The dramatic growth and dispersal of immigrant families has changed the face of public education at a time when states are experiencing increased school accountability pressures under the No Child Left Behind Act and its recent successor, the Every Student Succeeds Act. Of particular concern is how these demographic shifts affect the academic well-being of Limited English Proficient (LEP) youth, the protected sub-group that most directly targets children from immigrant families. Using individual-level data from the National Association of Educational Progress (NAEP), we examine how eighth grade test scores of LEP youth differ across new and established immigrant destination states. Results show that achievement for LEP youth is higher in new than in established immigrant states, but that this advantage is not consistent across ethnic/racial groups. LEP youth in new immigrant states benefit from more favorable demographic characteristics and family and school resources, but these differences only explain a small portion of the achievement gap.

 

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How to Cite
Spees, L. P., Potochnick, S., & Perreira, K. M. (2016). The academic achievement of Limited English Proficient (LEP) youth in new and established immigrant states: Lessons from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Education Policy Analysis Archives, 24, 99. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.24.2130
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Author Biographies

Lisa P. Spees, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Lisa P. Spees is a postdoctoral fellow at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on examining health policies and disparities among minority and underserved populations. 

Stephanie Potochnick, University of Missouri-Columbia

Stephanie Potochnick is an Assistant Professor of Public Affairs and Public Health at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Her research examines the social demography of immigration and how programs and policies can promote the education and health of immigrant youth. 

Krista M. Perreira, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Krista M. Perreira is a Professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the relationships among family, health, and social policy, with an emphasis on Latino and immigrant families. 

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