The politics of schools and money: Building awareness about channeling practices for supplemental resource allocations to serve English language learners

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Abstract

One of the aims of K-12 supplemental programs is to maximize the potential for success of students who bring special needs into a classroom. Therefore, the intent behind a large majority of these additional resources is to support programs that are designed to address the needs of otherwise marginalized students by leveling the playing field. The purpose of this work is to shed light on how supplemental funds are potentially channeled from the source to the students for whom these funds are intended and whose needs these funds intend to serve. Specifically, this article draws attention to the dynamics associated with channeling practices of supplemental dollars for English language learners. This article concludes with a practical discussion to offer insights for navigating the typical channeling practices of these funding streams. 

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How to Cite
Okhremtchouk, I. (2017). The politics of schools and money: Building awareness about channeling practices for supplemental resource allocations to serve English language learners. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 25, 17. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.25.2819
Section
Education Finance and English Language Learners
Author Biography

Irina Okhremtchouk, Arizona State University

Irina Okhremtchouk is an Assistant Professor in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. She earned a Ph.D. in Education with a focus on School Organization and Policy from University of California, Davis. Her research interests include English language learners, classification/stratification practices for language minority students, school organization, school finance, and experiences of in-and-pre-service teachers. In addition to her academic work and research activities, Dr. Okhremtchouk has over 12 years of experience working in 6-12 education settings as a schoolteacher, program coordinator, and school board member.