Bridging the Gap between Testing and Technology in Schools

Main Article Content

Abstract

The widening gap between the increased use of technology in schools and the absence of computers in state-level testing programs raises important implications for policies related to the use of both technology and testing in schools. In this article, we summarize recent developments in the use of technology in schools and in state level testing programs. We then describe two studies indicating that written tests administered on paper underestimate the achievement of students accustomed to working on computers. We conclude by discussing four approaches to bridging the gap between technology and testing in U.S. schools.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Russell, M., & Haney, W. (2000). Bridging the Gap between Testing and Technology in Schools. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 8, 19. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v8n19.2000
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Michael Russell, Boston College

Michael Russell is a research fellow for the National Board on Educational Testing and Public Policy and a research associate in the Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation and Educational Policy at Boston College. His research interests include standards based reform, assessment, and educational technology.

Walt Haney, Boston College

Walt Haney, Ed.D., Professor of Education at Boston College and Senior Research Associate in the Center for the Study of Testing Evaluation and Educational Policy (CSTEEP), specializes in educational evaluation and assessment and educational technology. He has published widely on testing and assessment issues in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, Review of Educational Research, and Review of Research in Education and in wide-audience periodicals such as Educational Leadership, Phi Delta Kappan, the Chronicle of Higher Education and the "Washington Post." He has served on the editorial boards of Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice and the American Journal of Education and on the National Advisory Committee of the ERIC Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation.