Global perspectives on high-stakes teacher accountability policies: An introduction

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Abstract

The aim of this special issue, “Global Perspectives on High-Stakes Teacher Accountability Policies”, is to provide insights into a diverse set of policies focusing on teachers’ accountability, including the underpinning ideas and cultural and socio-economic contexts of these policies, as well as their effects on teachers’ work, the teaching profession and the broader educational environment. While these articles highlight the influence of the “global testing culture” on education systems world-wide, they also demonstrate the need for understanding accountability systems as context-specific. As such, we urge scholars to consider the social, historical, political and geographical contexts within which their research is situated and to promote a research agenda that looks at the specific responses and effects that accountability policies produce in different regulatory settings. This introductory article, first, clarifies the main focus and conceptual framework of the special issue and, second, presents an overview of the papers included in the issue and their main contents.

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How to Cite
Holloway, J., Sørensen, T. B., & Verger, A. (2017). Global perspectives on high-stakes teacher accountability policies: An introduction. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 25, 85. https://doi.org/10.14507/epaa.25.3325
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Global Perspectives on High-Stakes Teacher Accountability Policies
Author Biographies

Jessica Holloway, Deakin University

Jessica Holloway is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre in Research for Educational Impact (REDI) at Deakin University. She draws on post-structural theory to understand contemporary modes of accountability and its production of new teacher and leader subjectivities. Her current project, entitled Teacher Leaders and Democracy: An International Study, looks at modes of distributive leadership in U.S. and Australian schools. 

Tore Bernt Sørensen, University of Bristol

Tore Bernt Sørensen completed his doctorate at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, UK, in 2017 with the dissertation “Work In Progress: The Political Construction Of The OECD Programme Teaching And Learning International Survey”. Tore’s research centers on comparative studies of education governance in a global context. Tore has a background as teacher and teacher trainer in Denmark. Before starting his doctorate, he worked in the Analysis and Studies Unit of the European Commission's Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

Antoni Verger, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Antoni Verger is associate professor at the Department of Sociology of the UAB. A former post-doctoral fellow at the University of Amsterdam, Antoni’s research analyses the relationship between global governance institutions and education policy, with a focus on the study of public-private partnerships and accountability policies in education. Currently, he is coordinating the research project REFORMED - Reforming Schools Globally: A Multiscalar Analysis of Autonomy and Accountability Policies in the Education Sector (ERC StG, 2016–2021).